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FAQs - Work Cover

What medical treatment is paid under WorkCover?

  • You are entitled to receive medical treatment from the medical practitioner of your choice. You are not obliged to obtain treatment from your employer's doctor. Your employer's doctor can of course often provide good treatment particularly in emergencies, but some workers choose to obtain treatment from their own doctors. For major procedures, prior approval from WorkCover is necessary, unless the treatment is urgent.
  • All routine medical treatment for your injury is paid by WorkCover. This includes the costs of hospitals, specialists, scans, physiotherapists, chiropractors, chemists etc. If surgery is also required because of your injury, its cost is covered.
  • In some circumstances WorkCover will also cover the costs of home help, including gardening.
  • WorkCover also covers the cost of gymnasium or swimming if approved by your doctor and if it is necessary to improve or maintain your condition.
  • Medical treatment costs remain payable after you return to work, or after your weekly payments cease if the treatment is necessary to ensure that your health or your ability to undertake activities of daily living does not deteriorate
Last Updated on Wednesday, 04 September 2013 22:13
 

Does my employer have to continue to contribute to my superannuation fund whilst I am off work?

There is no obligation on your employer to contribute to your superannuation fund whilst you are absent from work on WorkCover. The obligation to contribute to superannuation under the Commonwealth legislation only applies to wages and salary that you receive whilst you are actually working. Under some industrial agreements, awards, workplace agreements or contracts, some employers are obliged to continue superannuation contributions for a limited period whilst a claimant is on WorkCover, for example, 12 months.

Last Updated on Wednesday, 04 September 2013 22:12
 

When do I need to register my new business for WorkCover? How much will it cost me? Can you briefly summarise the rules?

WorkCover is Victoria's injured workers' compensation system.

If you are a Victorian employer and your annual remuneration is $7,500 or more, you must take out a WorkCover policy and pay WorkCover premiums for your workers (refer definition below).

An employer's WorkCover premium depends on a number of factors:

  • the size of your payroll (remuneration);
  • your safety or claims experience; and
  • your previous premium rate (which, for small employers is mainly based on the risk rating of their industry).

Your insurer must be advised of your annual remuneration to calculate the premium. The premium can be payable yearly in advance (a discount applies) or by instalments.

Business Start-ups      Services Offered      FAQ's Business Structure     FAQ's Superannuation

Last Updated on Thursday, 22 August 2013 05:18
 

What is Remuneration?

The basic definition of remuneration is:

Gross wages and salaries (including overtime and all pay loadings), bonuses, commissions, allowances, items included as part of an employment package and any other fringe benefits provided in accordance with the Fringe Benefits Tax Assessment act.

Business Start-ups      Services Offered      FAQ's Business Structure     FAQ's Superannuation

Last Updated on Thursday, 22 August 2013 05:19
 

How does an employer register?

To register for WorkCover you must complete an official form, available from either your accountants, post offices, WorkCover insurers or the Victorian Workcover Authority.

As part of your application, you must nominate a WorkCover insurer. This will be the company that will collect your WorkCover premium and administer claims for any injured workers.

Business Start-ups      Services Offered      FAQ's Business Structure     FAQ's Superannuation

Last Updated on Thursday, 22 August 2013 05:20
 

Who is a Worker?

For the purposes of determining a "worker", the WorkCover laws specifically outlines them, and they include:

  • a full-time employee;
  • a part-time employee;
  • a casual employee;
  • any person who is deemed to be a worker or deemed to be working under a contract of service; and
  • a director working for an employer.


For example, a medical practitioner employed by their company or trust is a "worker" for the purposes of paying WorkCover premiums.

Business Start-ups      Services Offered      FAQ's Business Structure     FAQ's Superannuation

Last Updated on Thursday, 22 August 2013 05:21
 

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